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Great Lakes Fish

All information from Michigan DNR Website

King Salmon - DNR link

The chinook is a fairly new variety of salmon introduced into the Great Lakes in the 1870s. Sometimes called "King Salmon", these fish did not reproduce successfully and eventually disappeared. In 1966, Great Lakes states Michigan, New York and Wisconsin, with the help of the province of Ontario reintroduced the Chinook. Anglers prize chinook partly because of their large size and the challenge they present for fishing, and partly because they make a delicious meal.
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Coho Salmon - DNR link

The average adult Great Lakes coho salmon weighs eight pounds. Like the chinook, coho are native to the Pacific coast of North America, and to parts of Asia. They were introduced into the Great Lakes in 1873 but the first successful plantings weren't until 1966. There was much excitement amount anglers and fish managers when coho made their first spawning run in the fall of 1967. Since that time, the coho has become a popular sport fish, in fact people come from all over the world to fish Michigan's great coho fishery.
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Steelhead - DNR link

Steelhead are valiant fighters and their flesh is outstanding no matter how it is cooked. An unbeatable combination that makes them one of the most popular North American sport fish.
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Lake Trout - DNR link

The lake trout or "salmon trout" as it is sometimes called, is the largest trout native to the Great lakes and other Michigan lake waters. Lake trout are avidly sought after by both commercial and sport anglers, for food as well as for the sport.
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Brown Trout - DNR link

Brown trout are close relative of the Atlantic salmon, and also were brought to North American waters as exotics. These natives of Europe and western Asia were introduced into New York and Michigan waters in 1883. Brown trout have thrived in their new home, and have become firmly established in all of our upper Great Lakes waters.
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